Odyssey comes to WVU, encourages students to think alternative fuels

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October 15, 2014 by Kendall Snee, WVU Daily Athenaeum

National Alternative Fuel Vehicle Day Odyssey is a celebration and promotion of alternative fuel and advanced technology vehicles.

On Wednesday, the outreach and educational event was held at West Virginia University.

Three example vehicles, all powered by alternative fuel, were parked outside of the WVU National Research Center for Coal and Energy on the Evansdale campus.

Outside of the National Research Center for Coal and Energy sat the new electric Chevrolet Volt. The Volt has been known to get 101 MPG in the city and 93 MPG on highways.Outside of the National Research Center for Coal and Energy sat the new electric Chevrolet Volt. The Volt has been known to get 101 MPG in the city and 93 MPG on highways.

Outside of the National Research Center for Coal and Energy sat the new electric Chevrolet Volt. The Volt has been known to get 101 MPG in the city and 93 MPG on highways.     (Photo by Andrew Spellman, WVU Daily Athenaeum)

Odyssey is coordinated by the National Alternative Fuels Training Consortium. With more than 152 locations within three countries, Odyssey’s mission is to educate and dismiss stereotypes about alternative fuel.

William Davis, director of NAFTC, attended the event and answered questions about the vehicles.

“We go to universities and various trade shows,” Davis said. “I believe in this company because it wants to help the public understand alternative energy. Our theme is clean, secure energy, and what that means is that the public needs to take responsibility for their choices that can make for a cleaner environment.”

Davis explained that people don’t understand these new electric or natural-gas-powered vehicles, so it deters them from buying one when they look to purchase a new car.

“Over 50 percent of America’s oil is imported from the Middle East, which isn’t good,” Davis said. “We must develop alternatives, because it’s a dangerous business we’re getting into.”

Davis further explained West Virginia is a powerhouse of resources, whether solar, wind or coal, and now with natural energy emerging, West Virginia is leading the charge for a greener America.

“I have the best job in the world,” Davis said. “I have four grandkids, and I know what I’m doing is going to make their lives better and nothing beats that. Odyssey has been recognized for their position on greener vehicles and will continue to pave the way for other companies.

Davis explained to the gathered audience that the Nissan takes eight hours to charge and displayed its futuristic design.

“I don’t think it looks weird,” said junior advertising student Jackson Montgomery. “I got to ride in it, and it was absolutely silent. That electric motor is a lot lighter and a lot faster than a regular car.”

For more information on the National Alternative Fuels Training Consortium, visit http://naftc.wvu.edu.

-NRCCE-

CONTACT:  Judy Moore; National Alternative Fuels Training Consortium 304.293.7882; Judy.Moore@mail.wvu.edu

See also: WVU Daily Athenaeum